Bachmann campaign didn’t know of staff departures

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MSNBC.com reports:

The five New Hampshire staffers, who quit Friday had not — as of Saturday morning — been in touch with the campaign to resign in a formal fashion,the Bachmann campaign tells NBC News.

Of the campaign’s former New Hampshire Director Jeff Chidester, campaign spokewoman Alice Stewart told NBC, “He talked to the media — just not us.”

The Bachmann campaign learned of the departures Friday through media reports. This explains why Bachmann herself questioned the reports during a phone interview with Radio Iowa Friday afternoon — and why the campaign said, in a statement issued after 5:00 pm ET Friday: “We have a great team in New Hampshire, and we have not been notified that anyone is leaving the campaign.”

Chidester confirmed his own departure, and that of four others, via text to NBC last night. All five paid New Hampshire staffers to the campaign left — Jeff Chidester, Nicole Yurek, Matt LeDuc, Caroline Gigler, and Tom Lukacz.

Michele Bachmann: Obama spent ‘$200 million/day’ during visit to India

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Really? $200 million per day for President Obama to make a short diplomatic trip overseas to India?

Assuming that the White House staff hasn’t increased by 50,000 or so employees recently (or that the 12 to 45 members of the White House advance team now each receive a per diem of $65,000 while on the road), one could reasonably surmise that Mrs. Bachmann’s calculations leading to her alleged $200 million daily expense were…

  1. Disingenuous?
  2. Patently untrue?
  3. Ill-informed?
  4. Indicative of severe deficiencies in reasoning ability, stunted emotional maturity and high-probability of adult-onset chronic bed-wetting?

Did she know that $200 million is more than the United States spends each day to conduct the entire war operation in Afghanistan? Does Bachmann understand anything outside of
the goofy false retail encampments of Woodbury, MN?

Now let’s watch Michele Bachmann make a complete fool out of herself in front of various cameras before national audiences:


[youtube http://youtu.be/OATKPpEOMxo]
[youtube http://youtu.be/mlPSRFyhzec]

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Is There Really Gold in Ft. Knox? – The Atlantic Monthly

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By Joshua Green, a senior editor of The Atlantic and a weekly political columnist for the Boston Globe

I’m quite fond of Ron Paul. I enjoyed spending time with him for this Atlantic profile. I liked learning about Austrian economics. I like the fact that he thinks differently than other Republicans and has the courage of his convictions. Washington is a more interesting place because of him. And he makes good copy. That’s especially true now that he has become, at long last, chairman of the subcommittee that oversees the Federal Reserve.

But I have to admit that even I did not foresee, and in fact never could have imagined, Paul’s latest crusade:
He’s skeptical that the United States really has the gold it claims to have in Ft. Knox. And he wants some answers!

Read more at The Atlantic…

 

MPR: “Shoot First Bill” would encourage Minnesotans to shoot first

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by Heather Martens, Minnesota Public Radio News

In January, Rep. Tony Cornish, R-Good Thunder, tried to repeal the state’s background check system for gun sales. This week, he wants to legalize a kind of murder.

House File 1467, which ought to be called “Shoot First,” will be heard in the House Public Safety Committee this Thursday. It would allow the killing of anyone who enters another’s yard, even when the person is unarmed and posing no threat; and it would allow the killing of anyone in a public place who seems threatening — again, even if the person is unarmed, and even if walking or driving away is a safe option.

Also buried in this bill is a loosening of concealed-carry permit laws to recognize all other state’s pistol permits in Minnesota, even states with lax background checks that issue permits valid for life. It also makes it harder for local law enforcement to prevent prohibited purchasers from getting permits to buy guns, and limits law enforcement’s ability to confiscate weapons in domestic violence situations.

The Shoot First bill includes the words “self-defense,” but it uses obscure legalese and a bizarre redefinition of the common word “domicile” to make the bill apply to much more than self-defense. “Domicile” is redefined to include not just a person’s home, but also the “curtilage” (fenced yard), “appurtenances” (outbuildings or garages), and even occupied cars (or conveyances). If someone enters “by force or by stealth” — in legal terms, that means as little “force” as turning a doorknob or opening an unlatched gate — then the person is “presumed” to intend to badly hurt someone. In court, a presumption cannot be rebutted, so no evidence would be allowed that showed the dead person had entered the yard by error, by invitation of the homeowner, to rescue a drowning child, or for any other reason.

Read the full story at Minnesota Public Radio News Online